TSU-MAPS at AMEC in San Francisco

COSET students attended a banquet at the Annual Medical Education Conference where medical students were congratulated to their matching to a residency program.

Student National Medical Association (SNMA) was founded in 1964 as a sub-division of the (NMA) after recognizing the need to give active support to medical students and encourage them in their pursuit of careers as physicians. The Minority Association of Pre-Health Students (MAPS) represent the undergraduate and post-bac student-run chapters that extend the mission of SNMA and NMA: increasing the number of African-American, Latino, and other students of color entering and completing health professional schools. Texas Southern University chapter of SNMA-MAPS attended AMEC for the third time. SNMA 54thAnnual Medical Education Conference (AMEC) took place on March-28 to April 1, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Our MAPS chapter was able to take 20 students fully funded including travel, registration and hotel costs thanks to the support of Texas Southern University’s College of Science, Engineering, and Technology (COSET). This event allowed us to be exposed to diverse career opportunities, network with medical representatives, and build professional and academic skills. This event included many schools such as University of Chicago, Vanderbilt Medical School, Meharry Medical School, Howard Medical School, Harvard Medical School just to name a few.

 

Dr. A. Sodipe (Biology) and 20 students of the TSU-MAPS (Minority Association of Pre-Health Students) participated at the Annual Medical Education Conference

Contributed by: Dr. A. Sodipe and K.Kalifa

Dr. Marian Hillar invited to Oxford University

Biology professor Dr. Marian Hillar has been invited to present a seminar at the Ian Ramsey Centre for Science and Religion at Oxford University in England. The conference, to be held July 19-22, was organized in collaboration with the International Society for Science and Religion. The conference theme is Religion, Society, and the Science of Life. Dr. Hillar’s seminar, Natural Moral Law: From the Stoics to Kant, Darwin and Modern Evolutionary Science will detail that modern science provides a biological basis for human moral behavior and validates philosophical speculation. The presentation is based on his book, Historical Development toward Non-Theistic, Humanist Ethics: Essays from the Ancient Stoics to Modern Science.

 

Source: TSU E-newsJune 19-25,2017

TSU has been awarded a NSF
Targeted Infusion Grant

From Left to right: Dr.Saydam (CO-I), Dr.Sapp (CO-I), Dr.Sundaresan (PI), Dr.Harvey (CO-PI), Dr.Peltier-Glaze (CO-I)

TSU was recently awarded a National Science Foundation Targeted Infusion Grant under PI, Dr. Alamelu Sundaresan, with Co-PI Dr. Mark Harvey and CO-Is Drs. John Sapp, Azime Saydam and Bernnell Peltier-Glaze. This project combines structured peer-mentor infused curricula coupled with faculty mentored summer research for the following courses within COSET:  MATH 136, CHEM 131, PHYS 237 and BIOL 131. The main objective of the proposal is to increase STEM retention of underrepresented students by offering dedicated peer mentoring and supervised faculty research opportunities. We are excited about this first full-fledged project of its kind at TSU consisting of an active learning concept and associated peer-mentoring, which will benefit both TSU students and the above four departments from June 2017 – May 2020. Peer mentors will be selected from upperclassmen in each of the departments and will be directly supervised by the PI, Co-PI and CO-Is. More to follow…

Center for Philosophy, Religious, and Socinian Studies

Mission and goals

The Center for Philosophy, Religious, and Socinian Studies conducts research and outreach on behalf of the largely unrecognized Socinian movement, its forefather Michael Servetus, and their profound influence on the development of the Enlightenment and beyond, including the foundation of American government. Over time, the Center has grown to encompass more than the Socinian movement to address relevant subjects in the fields of philosophy, ethics, humanism, and religion. The Center has produced dozens of publications (articles and books) and serves as an internationally recognized authoritative resource in these areas. The major work of Michael Servetus, forefather of freedom of religion, and freedom of conscience, was translated for the first time in the Center from original Latin into English (five volumes).

Director

Professor
SB 203-D | (713) 313.7990
marian.hillar@tsu.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Contact Information

Prof. Marian Hillar, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies
Department of Biology
Texas Southern University

Projects

  1. Current project involves preparation of a monograph on the development of the Socinian movement in Europe and the United States and its effect of the formation of the American Constitution.
  2. Evaluation of commonalities in major world religions in order to build a consensus in public morals in a pluralistic society.

Investigators

Professor
SB 203-D | (713) 313.7990
marian.hillar@tsu.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Mrs. Clare Allen (Stettler), M.A.
Research Assistant

Research and Services

The Center conducts historical research in the areas of history of ideas, philosophy, and religions and attempts to build a consensus to provide an intellectual guidance to modern times. Research and publications of the Center are internationally recognized as being in the forefront of the scholarly efforts in the subject.

Recently the Center developed a new course offered at the Department of Biology entitled : History and Philosophy of Science, BIO 435

Labs and Equipment

The Center requires access to library sources and use of modern and classical languages. Modern Internet is an invaluable tool for access to such resources, as well as access to Fondren Library in Houston. Also several library resources in foreign countries at major universities were utilized for research.

Short Introduction

socinus.jpg

Mausoleum of Faustus Socinus

Socinians were members of the specific radical Reformation international religious group that was formed originally in Poland and in Transylvania in the XVIth century and went beyond the limited scope of the reform initiated by Luther or Calvin. At the roots of their religious doctrines was the Antitrinitarianism developed by Michael Servetus (1511-1553) and transplanted by Italian Humanists, as well as the social ideas borrowed initially from the Anabaptists and Moravian Brethren. About the middle of the XVIth century a variety of Antitrinitarian sects emerged. They called themselves Christians or Brethren, hence Polish Brethren, also Minor Reformed Church. Their opponents labeled them after the old heresies as Sabellians, Samosatinians, Ebionites, Unitarians, and finally Arians. They were also known abroad as Socinians, after the Italian Faustus Socinus (1539-1604) (Fausto Sozzini, nephew of Lelio Sozzini) who at the end of the XVIth century became a prominent figure in the Raków Unitarian congregation for systematizing the doctrines of the Polish Brethren. Although the spirit of religious liberty was one of the elements of the Socinian doctrine, the persecution and coercion they met as a result of the Counter Reformation led them to formulate the most advanced ideas in the realm of human freedom and church-state relations.The intellectual ferment Socinian ideas produced in all of Europe determined the future philosophical trends and led directly to the development of Enlightenment. The precursor ideas of the Polish Brethren on religious freedom were later expanded, perfected and popularized by John Locke (1632-1704) in England , Pierre Bayle (1647-1706) in France and Holland, and Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) in Holland. The ideas of John Locke were transplanted directly to the American continent by James Madison and Thomas Jefferson who implemented them for the first time in the American legislation.

cprss-fig1.jpg

Figure 1

The Polish Brethren were forerunners of the later thinkers who developed the ideas of the Enlightenment and introduced modern humanistic ideals. Their achievements are the highest in Europe of their times and originated all modern trends in political, social and moral sciences, in biblical and religious studies, and in concepts of the absolute freedom of intellectual inquiry, liberty of conscience and complete nonantagonistic separation of church and state. They put to practice the highest ethical ideals.The doctrines of the Polish Brethren represented a humanistic reaction to a medieval theology based on submission to the Church’s totalitarian authority. Though they retained the scripture as something supra rationem, they analyzed it rationally and believed that nothing should be accepted contra rationem. Their social and political thought underwent a significant evolutionary process from the very utopian trend condemning participation in war and holding public and judicial office to a moderate and realistic stand based on mutual love, support of the secular power of the state, active participation in social and political life, and defense of social equality. They spoke out against the enserfment of peasants, a recurring issue in Poland not solved until the XXth century.

cprss-fig2.jpg

Figure 2

They were the first to postulate the complete separation of church and state, an idea never before discussed in Christian societies. Their spirit of absolute religious freedom expressed in their practice and writings, “determined, more or less immediately, all the subsequent revolutions in favor of religious liberty.” Their rationality set the trend for the philosophical ideas of the Enlightenment and determined future development of all modern intellectual endeavors. After expulsion they were forced into oblivion for three centuries, forgotten in a country that continued to be dominated by the Catholic Church.

cprss-fig3.jpg

Raphael – School of Athens

cprss-sijena.jpg

Statue of Michael Servetus in Villanueva de Sijena

The intellectual ferment Socinian ideas produced in all of Europe determined the future philosophical trends and led directly to the development of Enlightenment. The precursor ideas of the Polish Brethren on religious freedom were later expanded, perfected and popularized by John Locke (1632-1704) in England and Pierre Bayle (1647-1706) in France and Holland. The ideas of John Locke were transplanted directly to the American continent by Thomas Payne, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and others and were implemented them for the first time in the American legislation.
The project of studies involves: 1. Translation of the original works written by Michael Servetus from Latin into English; 2. Recovery of writings of the Socinians and spreading the information about their ideas; 3. Tracing the development of ideas which eventually led to the formation of American society and its Constitution with all its ideals and freedoms.

Books written and edited, published during the last ten years

  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 14, pp. 90. American Humanist Association, 2006.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 15, pp. 160. American Humanist Association, 2007.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 16 (1) Spring-Summer, pp. 96. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2008.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 16 (2) Fall-Winter, pp. 120. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2008.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 17 (1) Spring-Summer, pp. 112. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2009.
  • Marian Hillar, and Christopher A. Hoffman, translators: “The Restoration of Christianity. An English Translation of Christianismi restitutio, 1553, by Michael Servetus (1511-1553). Translated by
  • Christopher A. Hoffman and Marian Hillar,” (Lewiston, NY; Queenston, Ont., Canada; Lampeter, Wales, UK: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2007). Pp. 409+xxix
  • Marian Hillar, and Christopher A. Hoffman, translators: “Treatise on Faith and Justice of Christ’s Kingdom by Michael Servetus. Selected and Translated from Christianismi restitutio by Christopher A. Hoffman and Marian Hillar,” (Lewiston, NY; Queenston, Ont., Canada; Lampeter, Wales, UK: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2008). Pp. 95 +xlv
  • Marian Hillar, and Christopher A. Hoffman, translators: “Treatise Concerning the Supernatural Regeneration and the Kingdom of the Antichrist by Michael Servetus. Selected and Translated from Christianismi restitutio by Christopher A. Hoffman and Marian Hillar,” (Lewiston, NY; Queenston, Ont., Canada; Lampeter, Wales, UK: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2008). Pp. 302+l
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 16 (2) Fall Winter, pp. 120. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2008.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 17 (1) Spring-Summer, pp. 114. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2009.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 17 (2) Fall-Winter, pp. 130. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2009.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 18 (1) Spring-Summer, pp. 96. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2010.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 18 (2) Fall-Winter pp. 108. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2010.
  • Marian Hillar, and Christopher A. Hoffman, translators: “Thirty Letters to Calvin & Sixty Signs of the Antichrist by Michael Servetus.” Translated from Christianismi restitutio by Christopher A. Hoffman and Marian Hillar (Lewiston, NY; Queenston, Ont., Canada; Lampeter, Wales, UK: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2010). Pp. 175 + lxxxvi.
  • Juan Naya and Marian Hillar, eds., “Michael Servetus, Heartfelt: Proceedings of the International Servetus Congress, Barcelona, 20-21 October, 2006,” (Lanham, MD and Plymouth UK: University Press of America, 2011). 430 pp.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 19 (1) Spring-Summer, pp. 106. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2011.
  • Marian Hillar, Robert D. Finch, editors “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 19 (2) Fall-Winter, pp. 116. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2011.
  • Marian Hillar, founding editor, “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 20 (1) Spring-Summer, pp. 106. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2012.
  • Marian Hillar, founding editor “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 20 (2) Fall-Winter pp. 126. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC, 2012.
  • Marian Hillar, Major study: From Logos to Trinity. The Evolution of Religious Beliefs from Pythagoras to Tertullian (Cambridge, UK, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012), 320 pp. + xi.
  • Marian Hillar, founding editor, “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 21 (1) Spring-Summer, pp. 120. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC; Equinox Sheffield, UK, 2013.
  • Marian Hillar, founding editor “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 21 (2) Fall-Winter pp. 126. American Humanist Association, Washington DC; Equinox, Sheffield, UK, 2013.
  • Marian Hillar, founding editor “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 22 (1) pp. 118. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC; Equinox, Sheffield, UK, 2014.
  • Marian Hillar, founding editor “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 22 (2) pp. 120. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC; Equinox, Sheffield, UK, 2014.
  • Marian Hillar, founding editor “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 23 (1) pp. 132. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC; Equinox, Sheffield, UK, 2015.
  • Marian Hillar, founding editor “Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism,” Vol. 23 (2) pp. 128. American Humanist Association, Washington, DC; Equinox, Sheffield, UK, 2015.
  • Marian Hillar, and Christopher A. Hoffman, translators: “Regarding the Mystery of the Trinity and the Teaching of the Ancients to Philip Melanchthon and His Colleagues”
    by Michael Servetus. Translated from Christianismi restitutio by Marian Hillar and Christopher A. Hoffman (Lewiston, NY; Queenston, Ont., Canada; Lampeter, Wales, UK: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2015), 103 pp + lii.
  • Marian Hillar, “The Historical Development Toward a Non-Theistic Humanistic Ethics: Essays from the Ancient Stoics to Modern Science.” (Lewiston, NY; Queenston, Ont., Canada; Lampeter, Wales, UK: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2015), 278 pp + lxii.

Journal publications in the last ten years

  • Marian Hillar,.”Socinian Precursors of the American Constitutional Separation of Church and State. Part II : Socinian Ideas on the Separation of State and Religion.” In The American Unitarian, Vol. 5, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 60-74.
  • Marian Hillar and Claire S. Stelter, translation from Polish of an article by Stanisław Cieniawa, “Let’s Learn Religion from … Flowers.” Published in Essays in thePhilosophy of Humanism, American humanist Association, Washington, D.C., Vol. 14, 2006, pp. 69-77.
  • Marian Hillar, “Christianismi restitutio (Restitución del Cristianismo): el programa religioso de Miguel Servet,” in Miguel Servet. Luz entre tinieblas, ed. Sergio Baches Opi, (Huesca: Instituto de Estudios Sijenenses, 2006), pp. 45-68.
  • Marian Hillar, “Christianismi restitutio (Restoration of Christianity): the religious program of Michael Servetus,” in Miguel Servet. Luz entre tinieblas, (Huesca: Instituto de Estudios Sijenenses, 2006), pp. 69-92.
  • Marian Hillar, “El legado de Servet. El camino del reconocimiento de la libertad de conciencia como derecho natural y cambio de paradigma social: de Servet a Thomas Jefferson,” in Miguel Servet. Luz entre tinieblas, ed. Sergio Baches Opi, (Huesca: Instituto de Estudios Sijenenses, 2006), pp. 93-108.
  • Marian Hillar, “The legacy of Servetus: Humanism and the beginning of change in the social paradigm: From Servetus to Thomas Jefferson, in Miguel Servet. Luz entre tinieblas, ed. Sergio Baches Opi, (Huesca: Instituto de Estudios Sijenenses, 2006), pp. 109-124.
  • Marian Hillar, “Numenius and Greek Philosophical Sources of Christian Doctrine.” In Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy, Istanbul. August 10- 17, 2003, (Turkish Philosophical Society, Ankara, 2006), Vol. 8, pp. 55-60.
  • Marian Hillar, “The Religious program of Michael Servetus in His major Work, Christianismi restitutio (The Rstoration of Christianity).” Journal from the Radical Reformation. Testimony to Biblical Unitarianism, Vol. 13, No. 2. Fall, 2006. pp. 2-19.
  • Marian Hillar, “Servetus and the Switch to the Humanistic Social Paradigm. An Historical Perspective on How the Social Paradigm Changes.” In Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, eds. Robert D. Finch, Marian Hillar, American Humanist Association, Houston, Vol. 15, 2007, pp. 91-116.
  • Marian Hillar, “Friedrich Nietzsche: The Genealogy of Morals. The First Essay. ‘Good and Evil,’ ‘Good and Bad’ and the Critique of the Christian Ethics.” In Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 92, July 2007, pp. 3-7.
  • Marian Hillar, “Numenius and the Hellenistic Sources of the Central Christian Doctrine” in A Journal from the Radical Reformation. A testimony to Biblical Unitarianism. Vol. 14, No. 1, Spring 2007, pp. 3-31.
  • Marian Hillar, “Friedrich Nietzsche: The Genealogy of Morals. The Second Essay. ‘Guilt,’ ‘Bad Conscience,’ and Related Matters.” In Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 94, August 2007, pp. 3-5.
  • Marian Hillar, “Friedrich Nietzsche: The Genealogy of Morals. The Third Essay: ‘What Do Ascetic Ideals Mean?’ (1) The Ascetic Ideal in Art. (2) The Philosopher’s Ascetic Ideal.” In Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 95, September 2007, pp. 5-7.
  • Marian Hillar, “Friedrich Nietzsche: The Genealogy of Morals. The Third Essay: “What Do Ascetic Ideals Mean?” (3) The Priest and His Ascetic Ideal (4) The Human Condition and the Function of Ascetic Priests. In Houston Forethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 96, October 2007, p. 5.
  • Marian Hillar, “Friedrich Nietzsche: The Genealogy of Morals. The Third Essay: “What Do Ascetic Ideals Mean?” (5) Mechanisms of Alleviating Depression and Corruption of Mental health (6) What Does the Ascetic Ideal Signify? Its Implications for Atheism. In Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 97, November 2007, pp. 4-6.
  • Marian Hillar, “Process Theology and Process thought in the Writings of Michael Servetus” in A Journal from the Radical Reformation. A testimony to Biblical Unitarianism. Vol. 14, No. 2, Fall 2007, pp. 31-38.
  • Marian Hillar, book review of “Socinianism and Arminianism. Antitrinitarians, Calvinists and Cultural Exchange in Seventeenth-Century Europe” Martin Mulsow and Jan Rohls, eds. (Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2005, ix + 306 pp.). In Houston Forethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 98, December, 2008, pp. 6-7.
  • Marian Hillar, “Moral Philosophy and Modern Science. Modern Science provides a Biological basis for Human Behavior and Validates Philosophical Speculation.” In Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 99, January, 2008, pp. 5-6.
  • Marian Hillar, “Humanist Ethics. A Global Ethics.” In Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 100, February 2008, pp. 5-6.
  • Marian Hillar, “The Stoic Ethics: Natural Development, Rationality, and Responsibility.” (1) Myth and Philosophy. In Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 101, February 2008, pp. 5-6.
  • Marian Hillar, “Friedrich Nietzsche: Social Origin of Morals, Christian Ethics, and Implications for Atheism in His The Genealogy of Morals,” published in the Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, Vol. 16 (1), 2008, pp. 71-96.
  • Marian Hillar, “The Stoic Ethics: Natural Development, Rationality, and Responsibility. (2) Fundamentals of Stoic Ethics.” In Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, Issue 102, March, 2008, pp. 5-6.
  • Marian Hillar, “The Stoic Ethics: Natural Development, Rationality, and Responsibility. (3) Development of the Concept of Values.” Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 103, May 2008, pp. 6-8.
  • Marian Hillar, “The Stoic Ethics: Natural Development, Rationality, and Responsibility. (4) Development of Virtue, the Paradigm of the Sage, and Philosophical determinism.” Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 104, June 2008, pp. 5-7.
  • Marian Hillar, “The Stoic Ethics: Natural Development, Rationality, and Responsibility. (5) Moral Responsibility.” Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 105, July, 2008, pp. 6-9.
  • Marian Hillar, “The Stoic Ethics: Natural Development, Rationality, and Responsibility. (6) Rational Assent. Impact of the Stoic Ethical Theory. Similarity with the Indian Thought. Confirmation by Modern Science.” Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 106, August, 2008, pp. 3-5.
  • Marian Hillar, “Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical perspective. Kant’s Moral Philosophy and its Reinterpretation. A Quintessential Humanistic Doctrine” (1). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 107, September, 2008, pp. 3-4.
  • Marian Hillar, “Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical perspective. Kant’s Moral Philosophy and its Reinterpretation. A Quintessential Humanistic Doctrine” (2). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 108, October, 2008, pp. 3-5.
  • Marian Hillar, “Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical perspective. Kant’s Moral Philosophy and its Reinterpretation. A Quintessential Humanistic Doctrine” (3). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 109, November, 2008, pp. 3-5.
  • Marian Hillar, “Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical perspective. Kant’s Moral Philosophy and its Reinterpretation. A Quintessential Humanistic Doctrine” (4). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 110, December, 2008, pp. 3-5.
  • Marian Hillar, Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Jürgen Habermas: A Practical Sense Sociologist and a Kantian Moralist in a Nutshell (1). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 111, January 2009, pp. 3-4.
  • Marian Hillar, Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Jürgen Habermas: A Practical Sense Sociologist and a Kantian Moralist in a Nutshell (2). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 112, February 2009, pp. 3-4.
  • Marian Hillar, Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Jürgen Habermas: A Practical Sense Sociologist and a Kantian Moralist in a Nutshell (3). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 113, March 2009, pp. 3-4.
  • Marian Hillar, Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Jürgen Habermas: A Practical Sense Sociologist and a Kantian Moralist in a Nutshell (4). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 114, April 2009, pp. 3-4.
  • Marian Hillar, Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Jürgen Habermas: A Practical Sense Sociologist and a Kantian Moralist in a Nutshell (5). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 115, May 2009, pp. 3-4.
  • Marian Hillar, Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Jürgen Habermas: A Practical Sense Sociologist and a Kantian Moralist in a Nutshell (6). Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 116, June 2009, pp. 3-5.
  • Marian Hillar, Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Jürgen Habermas: A Practical Sense Sociologist and a Kantian Moralist in a Nutshell (7). Published in theHouston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 117, July 2009, pp. 3-4.
  • Marian Hillar, Foundation of Kant’s Moral Philosophy and its Reinterpretation: A Quintessentail Humanisstic Doctrine, published in the Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, Vol. 17 (1), Spring-Summer 2009, pp. 71-90.
  • Marian Hillar, Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Benedict Spinoza and His Revival of Naturalistic Ethics (1). Published in Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 119, October 2009, pp. 3-4.
  • Marian Hillar, “Discovery of a New Species of Human Ancestors: Ardipithicus Ramidus,” Published in Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 120, November 2009, pp. 4-5.
  • Marian Hillar, “Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Benedict Spinoza and His Revival of Naturalistic Ethics “(2). Published in Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 121, November 2009, pp. 4-5
  • Marian Hillar, “The Polish Socinians: Contribution to Freedom of Conscience and the American Constitution,” in Dialogue and Universalism, Vol. XIX, No. 3-5, 2009.
  • Marian Hillar, “Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Benedict Spinoza and His Revival of Naturalistic Ethics” (3). Published in Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 122, January 2010, pp. 6-7.
  • Marian Hillar, “What Does Modern Science Say about the Origin of Religion?” Published in the Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 123, February 2010, pp. 4-8
  • Marian Hillar, “Roots of Humanist Ethics: A Historical Perspective. Benedict Spinoza and His Revival of Naturalistic Ethics” (4). Published in Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 125, April 2010, pp. 6-7.
  • Marian Hillar, book review of Rodrigue Tremblay, The Code for Global Ethics. Ten Humanist Principles. Preface by Paul Kurtz (Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2010). Published in Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 126, May 2010, pp. 10-12.
  • Marian Hillar, “What Does Modern Science Say about the Origin of Cooperation? Science Confirms Philosophy.” Published in Houston Freethought Alliance Newsletter, issue 127, June 2010, pp. 3-7.
  • Marian Hillar, “What Does Modern Science Say about the Origin of Cooperation? Science Confirms Philosophy.” Published in the Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, Vol. 18 (2), Fall – Winter 2010, pp. 43-52.
  • Marian Hillar, “Why the Memory of Servetus Should be Kept Alive: A Historical Perspective,” a chapter in the book: Juan Naya and Marian Hillar, eds., “MichaelServetus, Heartfelt: Proceedings of the International Servetus Congress, Barcelona, 20-21 October, 2006,” (Lanham, MD and Plymouth UK: University Press of America, 2011). pp. 267-298.
  • Marian Hillar, ”Jürgen Habermas: A Practical Sense Sociologist and a Kantian Moralist in a Nutshell.” Published in the Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, Vol. 19 (2), Fall –Winter 2011, pp. 1-26.
  • Marian Hillar, “Lelio et Faust Socin: fondateurs du socinianisme, leurs vies et théologie,” traduit en français par Christian Callas. Published in Cahiers Michel Servet, No. 16, février 2012, pp. 1-26.
  • Marian Hillar, “Dziedzictwo Braci Polskich. Rozdział Religii od Państwa i Wolność Sumnienia.” (“The Legacy of the Polish Brethren. Separation of Religion and State and Freedom of Conscience.”) Published in Gazeta AMG, a monthly of the Medical University of Gdańsk, Vol. 22, July, 2012, No. 7 (259), pp. 34-38.
  • Marian Hillar, “Philo’s Logos Doctrine. Bridging the two Cultures and Creating the Philosophical and Theological Foundations of Christianity,” in Dialogue and Universalism Vol. XXI, (4) 2012, pp. 59-90.
  • Marian Hillar, “What Does Modern Science Say about the Origin of Religion?” in in Dialogue and Universalism Vol. Vol. XXII (4) 2012, pp. 111-120.
  • Marian Hillar, “Creationism and Evolution. Misconceptions about Religion and Science.” in Dialogue and Universalism Vol. XXII (4) 2012, pp. 133-160.
  • Marian Hillar, “Servet y el nuevo paradigma histórico” Chapter in a book :“Miguel Servet. Los valores de un hereje,” Heraldo de Aragón, 2013, pp. 100-102.
  • Marian Hillar, “What Does Modern Science Say about the Origin of Cooperation? Science Confirms Philosophy” in Dialogue and Universalism, Vol. XXIII (3) 2013, pp. 23-34.
  • Marian Hillar, “Dziedzictwo Serveta” (“Legacy of Servetus”), published in Pistis, wrzesień (September) 2011, pp. 27-31. This is a translation (by Rafał Sajna) into Polish of “The Legacy of Servetus: Humanism and the Beginning of Change in the Social Paradigm. On the Occasion of the 450th Anniversary of His Martyrdom.” In A Journal from the Radical Reformation. A Testimony to Biblical Unitarianism. Vo. 11, No. 2, Winter 2003, pp. 34-41.
  • Marian Hillar, “Philo on Evil.” An article for the Encyclopedia of Evil. Scheduled for publication in June 2016.

Conference papers and presentations during the last ten years

  • “Hellenistic Sources of Post-Nicene Christianity.” Paper read at the 4th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 11 – 14, 2006.
  • “Jesus after 2000 Years – Question of Historicity of Jesus.” Seminar of the Ideas Club, Humanists of Houston, February 26, 2006.
  • “Freedom of Conscience and Michael Servetus: The beginning of change of the Social Paradigm.” Paper read at the meeting of the South-Central Renaissance Conference, St. Thomas University, Houston, TX, March 9-11, 2006.
  • “The Existence of God and Atheism.” Seminar for the Humanists of Houston, July 15, 2006.
  • “¿Porqué hay que mantener viva la memoria de Servet?” Seminar presented at the International Servetus Congress, Barcelona, Spain, October 20-21, 2006.
  • Review of the book by Richard Dawkins “The God Delusion,” Ideas Club. Houston, January 21, 2007.
  • Review of the book by Richard Dawkins “The God Delusion,” Science and Religion Discussion, Melanchthon Institute, Houston, Texas, February 16, 2007.
  • Seminar “The First Translation into English of the First Part of Christianismi restitutio of Michael Servetus and Evaluation of its Theology.” South-Central Renaissance Conference, San Antonio, Texas, March 8-10, 2007.
  • Paper read at the International Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature, “The First Translation of the First Part of Christianismi restitutio of Michael Servetus and the Evaluation of its Biblical Theology.” Vienna, July 22-27, 2007, pp. 25-33.
  • Seminar for the Ideas Club, Humanists of Houston, “Does Modern Science Invalidate Philosophy? Modern Science and Ethics.” Ideas Club of Humanists of Houston, September 23, 2007.
  • Seminar for Religion, Ethics, and Society Club, “Psychology of Atheism According to Nietzsche’s Third Essay in Genealogy of Morals,” Houston, November 24, 2007.
  • Seminar for Science and Religion Discussion Group, “Habermas on Society and Religion,” Christ the King Lutheran Church, Houston, TX January 18, 2008.
  • Seminar presented for Science and Religion Discussion Group, “Modern Science and Ethics. Part I, Philosophical Ethical Inquiry,” Christ the King Lutheran Church, Houston, TX November 14, 2008.
  • Paper “Natural Moral Law and the Modern Evolutionary Science. Reinterpretation of the Natural Law and Moral PHILOSOPHY.” Presented at the 7th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 9 – 12, 2009.
  • Seminar presented at the Texas Academy of Sciences meeting, “Radiation and Radiation Safety,” Texas Tech University, Junction, TX, March 5-7, 2009
  • Seminar for Research Week, Texas Southern University, “What Does Modern Science Say about the Origin of Human Morality?” Houston, TX April 3, 2009.
  • Seminar presented for Science and Religion Discussion Group: “How a Religious Belief Led to the Discovery of the Pulmonary Blood Circulation.” Christ the King Lutheran Church, Houston, April 17, 2009.
  • Seminar presented for the Humanists of Houston: “Michael Servetus (1511-1553): Theologian, Philosopher, Scientist, and Humanist.” Houston, May 15, 2009.
  • Seminar presented for the Science and Religion Discussion Group: “Conflict between Science and Religion.” Christ the King Lutheran Church, Houston, October 16, 2009.
  • Seminar for Ideas Club, “The Last professors,” review of the book by Donoghug “The last professors.” Houston, October 24, 2009
  • Seminar for Religion, Ethics and Society Club, “Review of the Book by Sanford Rives, ‘Did Calvin Murder Servetus?,’” Houston, November 28, 2009.
  • Seminar for the Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism Symposium, “Moral Philosophy and Religion Facing Science. Humanistic Synthesis.” Presented at 69th Annual Conference of the American Humanist Association, San Jose CA, June 4-6, 2010.
  • Conference with the Editors and Contributors to Dialogue and Universalism, an international philosophical Journal published in Warsaw, “Polish Brethren (Socinians) and Their Role in the European History,” Warsaw July 22, 2010.
  • Lecture: “Michael Servetus: Intellectual Giant, Humanist, and Martyr,” lecture for the Thoreau Woods Unitarian Universalist Church, Huntsville, TX, September 19, 2010.
  • Seminar for Science and Religion Discussion Group: “What Does Modern Science Say about the Origin of Cooperation?” Christ the King Lutheran Church, Houston Texas, October 15, 2010.
  • Seminar for TSU Interdisciplinary Research Conference: “Regulation and Control in Biological Systems and Beyond …” Texas Southern University, November 4, 2010.
  • Paper “Natural Foundation of Moral Philosophy,” Presented at the 9th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 9 – 12, 2011.
  • Seminar for Open House, Physics Department at Texas Southern University, “Biological Effects of Radiation,” Houston, March 30, 2011.
  • Seminar “Natural Moral law and Modern Evolutionary Science. Reinterpretation of the Natural Law,” presented for Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism Symposium, American Humanist Association, Cambridge, MA, April 7-10, 2011.
  • Seminar “What Unitarian Universalists Should Know about Socinians?” Presented for the Emerson Unitarian Church, Houston, June 26, 2011.
  • Seminar for the Ideas Club, Humanists of Houston, “From the Polish Brethren or Socinians to Liberal Religion or How the Modernity was Introduced into the Western World?” August, 28, 2011.
  • Seminar: “The Legacy of Michael Servetus: the Radical Change in the Thought Pattern, Freedom of Conscience and a Switch to the Humanistic Moral Social Paradigm.”
  • The Keynote speaker at the Conference “The Western Heritage of Humanism, Skepticisn, and Freethought. Toward a Reasonable World.” Organized by the Department of Religious Studies at the San Diego University and the Institute for the Study of American Religion. San Diego, September 16-18, 2011.
  • Seminar for Science, Religion Discussion Group, Christ the King Lutheran Church, “Evolution of the Messianic Expectations in the Hebrew Culture: Hebrew Bible, the Writings of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Pseudoepigrapha,” Houston, November 18, 2011.
  • Seminar for Radiation Safety Training Workshop, “Biological Effects of Radiation,” Texas Southern University, Houston, November 18, 2011.
  • Seminar for the Science and Religion Discussion Group, Christ the King Lutheran Church, “Philo of Alexandria: Bridging the Hebrew Religion with the Greek Philosophy and Religion,” Houston, May 18, 2012.
  • Seminar for Polish Philosophical Society, Editorial Board of “Dialogue and Universalism,” and Institute of Philosophy and Social Sciences of the Polish Academy of Sciences, “Rozwój Hellenistyczno-Judeo-Chrześcijańskich Wierzeń Religijnych od Pitagorasa do Tertuliana,” (“Evolution of the Hellenistic, Judaic, and Christian religious Beliefs from Pythagoras to Tertullian”) Warsaw, May 29, 2012.
  • Seminar for the Editorial Board of “Dialogue and Universalism,” “Dziedzictwo Braci Polskich: Rozdział Religii od Państwa i Wolność Sumienia,” (“The Legacy of the Polish Brethren: Separation of Religion from State and Freedom of Conscience”) Warsaw, June 2, 2012.
  • Seminar for Religion, Ethics and Society Club, “Naturalistic Spirituality: Beauty of Our Earth and Wisdom of Sages Houston, August 25, 2012.
  • Seminar for Radiation Safety Training Workshop, “Biological Effects of Radiation,” Texas Southern University, Houston, October 26, 2012.
  • Seminar for Religion, Ethics and Society Club, “Does Archaeology Prove the Existence of Jesus? An Alternative Explanation.” Houston, October 27, 2012.
  • Seminar for College of Science and Technology, Texas Southern University, Houston: “Creationism and Evolution: Misconceptions about Science and Religion.” Houston, December 3, 2012.
  • Seminar for the Science and Religion Discussion Group, Christ the King Lutheran Church, /> “From the Polish Socinians to the American Constitution. A Study in Freedom of /> Conscience.” Houston, January 18, 2013.
  • Paper, “The Stoic logic and Egyptian divine metaphysics as the sources of the />Tertullian doctrine of the Trinity.” Presented at the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy, Athens, Greece, August 4-10, 2013.
  • Seminar for Science and religion Discussion Group, Christ the King Lutheran Church, Houston, September 20, 2013.
  • “Does Archaeology Prove the Existence of Jesus? An Alternative Explanation.” Houston, September 20, 2013.
  • Presentation : “Turkish Language School at the Fatih University, Istanbul,” for the Raindrop Turkish Center, Houston, August 19, 2013.
  • Presentation : “Reading Poetry for the World Poetry Day,” poems by Pablo Neruda, Charles Baudelaire, Haether Dolohau, and Orhan Veli Kanik. For the Raindrop Turkish Center, Houston, April 10, 2014.
  • Presentation : “Photosynthesis: Its Discovery and How Does it Work?” Presentation for the Science and Religion Discussion Group, Christ the King Lutheran Church, Houston, April, 21, 2014.
  • Seminar : “How to Think about Religion, Science and Ethics. From Antiquity to Modernity.” Presented for Ideas Club, Houston, July 27, 2014.
  • Seminar : “What Does Modern Science Say about the Origin of Human Moral Behavior? Science Confirms Philosophy.” Research Week, Texas Southern University, Houston, April 2, 2015.
  • Seminar for Humanists of Houston: “How the Struggle for Freedom of Conscience and Separation of State and Religion was Won in the West. A Study in the History of Freedom of Conscience.” Houston, September 18, 2015.
  • Seminar for Ideas Club, Humanists of Houston: “Science and Morality”, Houston, November 14, 2015.
  • Paper “Modern Science Explains Natural Moral Law Postulated by Philosophers.” Presented at the 14th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 9 – 12, 2016.
  • Presentation “The Role of the Polish Socinians for the Development of American Constitution and Democracy” given for The Polish Institute of History, Polish Academy of Science, Warsaw, February 22, 2016.

Research

The Center offers opportunity for students in Humanities at Texas Southern University to engage in research leading to their M.A. and /or Ph.D. thesis/dissertation.

We solicit participation of interested students for research in the areas of interest to the Center as well as we invite other faculties at Texas Southern University for a collaborative work.

Dale, Zuri

Education and Training

  • B.S. Texas Southern University Biology May 2011-Cum Laude
  • Texas A&M University MWM Water Mgmt. &Hydrological Sciences August 2014

Biography

Research Interests

Funding

  • Hispanic Leaders in Agriculture and the Environment Fellow, Texas A&M University
    • Bridge to Doctorate Fellow, Texas A&M University 2011-2013: 30,000/year and 9,000/year tuition assistance

Williams, Warren

Education and Training

  • Cellular and Molecular Biology – Ph.D. University of Illinois ; 1975 Urbana, Illinois
  • Developmental Biology M.S. – Texas Southern University; 1969
  • Biology B.S. – Texas Southern University; 1967

Biography

Research Interests

Research/Scholarly Activities

Recent Publications

Williams , W.E. and J.W. Drake; Mutagenesis in Bacteriophage T4. American Society for Microbiology 104:218.

Williams, Warren E. and John W. Drake. Mutator Mutations in Bacteriophage T4 Gene 42 (dHMC Hydroxymethylase)

Funding

  1. Studies into the Mechanism of Action of the Bacteriophage T4 Gene 42 Protein Product. TSU; 1975 1976; $4,000.00
  2. The Mechanism of Action of the Bacteriophage T4 Gene 42 Product. Division of Research Resources, National Institutes of Health; 1976 1992. $579,400.00.

Sundaresan, Alamelu

Education and Training

  • Environmental Sciences, Ph.D – University of Texas, School of Public Health, Houston, TX. 1997
  • MSc Medical Entomology 1990 – Vector Control Research Center (World Health Organization), Pondicherry, India. 1990
  • Zoology BSc – Womens Christian College, Madras, India, 1988

Biography

 

Research Interests

 

Research/Scholarly Activities

Primary Research Capability: Immune suppression, bone biology, tissue engineering, cardiovascular biomarkers and nutritional immunomodulation.

  1. Upstream targets in lymphocyte signaling in microgravity
  2. Adaptive genetic response gene suites in microgravity, hypergravity and high altitude stress
  3. Lymphocyte locomotion and signal transduction in microgravity
  4. Immune suppression, cardiovascular biomarkers and nutritional immunomodulation.
  5. Bone tissue engineering and resorption models
  6. Melanoma models in microgravity
  7. Particulate and nanoparticulate toxicity models
  8. Three dimensional mathematical tissue modeling of heavy ion effects.

Other Research Capabilities

  1. Molecular Methods

Extraction of plasmid DNA, Purification of DNA & RNA, Southern and Northern blot hybridization, Restriction and elution of DNA fragments, Ligation reactions, Transformation of bacteria, Polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR, Real time PCR, Transfection of mammalian cells, Subcloning using viral and non-viral vectors, RNase protection Assay, Gel-shift assays, Nuclear run on Assay,Screening cDNA libraries.

  1. Protein Methods

SDS (Sodium dodecyl sulfate) Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, Immunoprecipitation, Protein purification, ELISA (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay), 2-D gels, Chromatography, Fluorometry.

  1. Cell Biology and Immunology Tissue engineering, tissue culture and cell line development from human biopsies, mammalian cell culture (Bone cells, lymphocytes, colon carcinomas, NHL-B
    lymphoma cell lines, neuroblastoma, leukemia, melanoma, AIDS lymphoma, alveolar macrophage, Burkitts lymphoma), Thymidineincorporation assay, Isolation of B and T cells, Immunohistochemistry, Immunofluorescence techniques , Confocal microscopy, Mammalian tissue culture and maintenance, Drug Testing and Bioassay, Analysis of apoptosis in lymphoid cells, Cell adhesion assays, Lymphocyte locomotion assay, Popliteal lymph node assay, Parasite culture techniques FISH, In situ hybridization, Thymidine incorporation assay, B cell activation assay. 4. Biochemical, Animal and Environmental Science Techniques Liposomal formulation of drugs, Glutathione S transferase assay, Superoxide dismutase assay, GTPase assay, Rodent lung lavage, Transgenic mouse colony maintenance, Rodent injections, General animal techniques, radiation techniques, soil analysis, microbial analysis, air sampling.
  2. Bioreactor Methods Bioreactor (NASA RWV and HARV) cell culture and detoxification. Research Interest Keywords: Projects Upstream targets in lymphocyte signaling in microgravity Adaptive genetic response gene suites in microgravity, hypergravity and high altitude stress Lymphocyte locomotion and signal transduction in microgravity Immune suppression, cardiovascular biomarkers and nutritional immunomodulation. Bone tissue engineering and resorption models Melanoma models in microgravity Particulate and nanoparticulate toxicity models Three dimensional mathematical tissue modeling of heavy ion effects.

Recent Publications (out of a total of xxx)

Books or Monographs

Sundaresan A, Risin D and Pellis NR. Cell Growth in Microgravity. In: Meyers, R.A. , Sendtko, A. and Henheik, P. (eds.), Encyclopedia of Molecular Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, Vol. 2, pp 303-321, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany, 2004.

Articles

  1. Sundaresan, A., Ponomarev, A., Vazquez, M., Guida, P., Kim, A., and Cucinotta, F., A Computer Model of the Effects of Heavy Ion Radiation on Human Tissue, Advances in Space Research, 47, pp 37-48, 2011.
  2. Sundaresan, A., Shah, S., Walker, P., Moore-Olufemi, S., Kulkarni, A., Andrassy, R., An Evidence based Review of a Lentinula edodes Mushroom Extract as Complementary Therapy in the Surgical Oncology Patient, JPEN July 2011 vol. 35 no. 4 449-458
  3. Sundaresan, A., Russomano, T., dos Santos, M., Bosquillon, C., Falcao,

F., Marriot, C., Forbes, B., Modeling the Effects of Microgravity on the Permeability of Air-Interface Respiratory Epithelial Cell Layers, Advances in Space Research, 46(6), pp 712-718, 2010.

Abstracts and Scholarly Papers

  1. Sundaresan, A., S. Mehta, B. A. Carabello, T. Schlegel, T. Russomano, M. Santos, C. Kaur, J. Reseland, C. M. Ott, N.R Pellis and D. Pierson, Placental Growth Factor (PlGf ) as a Biosignature of Inflammation in Microgravity-In Coronary Artery Disease and Stress, Accepted for Oral presentation at the International Academy of Aerospace Medicine Congress, Singapore, October 2010.
  2. Sundaresan, A., Tissue Like Assemblies in Analog Microgravity, Scandinavian Society of Biomaterials, Hafjell, Norway, April 12-16, 2010.
  3. Sundaresan, A., Space Toxicology for the Future, PlGf, a Possible Predictor for Cardiac Dysfunction in Microgravity, The European Low Gravity Research Association Conference and Interdisciplinary Transport Phenomena Conference, September and October, 2009.

Sodipe, Ayodotun

Education and Training

  • B.S. Biology – Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 1990
  • Ph.D. Environmental Toxicology – Texas Southern Univ., Houston, TX 2008

Research Interests

Mycology and forensic biology

Field 1, Field 2, Field 3

Research/Scholarly Activities

NULL

Recent Publications

Georgette Rolle, Sarah Munyi, Olufisayo A Jejelowo, Ayodotun O Sodipe, and Shishir Shishodia. High energy radiation induced activation of Cox-2 and MMP-9 is mediated by NF-Kappa B. Astrobiology science Conference. 2010.

M Akram Tariq, Shishir Shishodia, Govindarajan T Ramesh, Ayodotun O Sodipe,Olufisayo A Jejelowo, Nader Pourmand. DNA Repair Genes Expression Analysis Of Acute Dose Charge Particle Radiation. Astrobiology Science Conference 2010

Olufisayo A Jejelowo, Nader Pourmand, Govindarajan Ramesh, Ayodotun O Sodipe, Honglu Wu and Shishir Shishodia. Biological effects of high radiation on mice .

Baluchamy S, Zhang Y, Ravichandran P, Sodipe A, Hall J, Jejelowo O, Gridley D, Wu H, Ramesh GT. Expression Profile of DNA damage signaling Genes in Proton Exposed Mouse Brain. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry 2010

BaluchamyS,ZhangY,RavichandranP,SodipeA,HallJ,JejelowoO,GridleyD,WuH,andRameshGT. Differential Expression Pattern of Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain after Exposure to 2GY Proton Radiation. Genomics , Proteomics, and Bioinformatics 2010.

Shishodia, Shishir

Education and Training

  • BS Biology (Zoology Honors), 1991, St. Xaviers College, Ranchi University, Ranchi, India
  • MS Zoology (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology), 1993, Center for Advanced Studies in Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
  • Ph. D Biotechnology, 1997, School of Biotechnology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
  • Dissertation Title: In Vitro Activation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages: Role of Signal Transduction
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship, 2001-2005, Department of Bio-immunotherapy/Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

Biography

Shishir Shishodia, PhD is a Professor of Biology at Texas Southern University. He earned his PhD in Biotechnology from Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India, and did his postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. His research interests include cytokine signaling, the role of transcription factors in tumorigenesis, and modulation of transcription by natural products. He has identified several natural compounds that exhibit anticancer properties and has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers, 10 book chapters, and co-edited the books /Resveratrol in Health and Disease and The Molecular Targets and Therapeutic Uses of Curcumin in Health and Disease/. Dr. Shishodia is a recipient of the BHU Medal for securing highest grades in MS Zoology Program at Banaras Hindu University, India. He received the Theodore N. Law Odyssey Special Fellow Award for outstanding scientific achievements at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas and the Texas Southern University Scholarly Research/Creative Activities Excellence Award. At The College of Science and Technology, Texas Southern University, he was awarded the Distinguished Research Award, Distinguished Service Award and multiple Deans Leadership Awards.

Research Interests

Rosenzweig, Jason

Education and Training

  • FloridaAtlanticUniversity B.S. 1998 Microbiology
  • University of South Florida Ph.D. student 1999-2000 Microbiology
  • University of Miami Ph.D. 2006 Microbiology

(MillerSchoolof Medicine)

Biography

Seminars given

2005 Stanford University Department of Genetics

2005 The Scripps Research InstitutePalm Beach,FLDepartment of Infectology

2007 University degli studi di Milano Department of Biomolecular Science and Biotechnology (Milan,Italy)

2009 TexasAcademyof Science General Meeting March 6^th, 2009

2009 Universityof Houston Downtowncampus Houston, TexasMarch 26^th, 2009

2009 TexasSouthern University Research Week March, 30^th 2009

2010Texas Southern University College of Sciecne and Technology Open House

2010 Delivered a guest lecture on the history of microbiology for the Laurentian University Partnership Center at Georgian College in Orillia, Ontario Canada 7/2010 after invitation from Professor Robert Killam

2010 Delivered a research seminar entitled /Yersina Pestis/Pathogenesis: a pathogen’s perpective in December (12/13/10) at the University of North Texas Health Science Center Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology by Dr. Harlan Jones.

2011 University of Houston (main campus) /Yerisnia pestis/ pathogenesis hosted by Dr. James Briggs 2/16/11

2011 Invited speaker at the 10th International Symposium on Aeromonas and Plesiomonas Gaveston Tx May 19-21, 2011. Seminar Title: /Aeromonas/hydrophila, a possible model organism for low shear modeled microgravity/(LSMMG) studies: Unexpected modulation of other enteric pathogens and/Yersinia pestis virulence following exposure to LSMMG.

Research Interests

Microbiology

Recent Publications (5 out of a total of 30)

  • Rosenzweig JA, Vrinceanu D, Hwang HM, and Shishodia S (2016) Vertical Alignment of Educational Opportunities for STEM Learners: Evaluating the Effects of Road Dust on Biological Systems. The American Biology Teacher November/December 78 (9): 710-716.
  • Andersson JA, Fitts EC, Kirtley ML, Ponnusamy D, Peniche AG, Dann SM, Motin VL, Chauhan S, Rosenzweig JA, Sha J, Chopra AK. (2016) New Role for FDA-Approved Drugs in Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2016 May 23;60(6):3717-29.
  • Shishodia S, Azu N, Rosenzweig JA, Jackson DA (2016) Guggulsterone for Chemoprevention of Cancer.Curr Pharm Des. 2016;22(3):294-306.
  • Suraju MO, Lalinde-Barnes S, Sanamvenkata S, Esmaeili M, Shishodia S, Rosenzweig JA. (2015) The effects of indoor and outdoor dust exposure on the growth, sensitivity to oxidative-stress, and biofilm production of three opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Sci Total Environ. 2015 Dec 15;538:949-58
  • Losh JS, King AK, Bakelar J, Taylor L, Loomis J, Rosenzweig JA, Johnson SJ, van Hoof A (2015) Interaction between the RNA-dependent ATPase and poly(A) polymerase subunits of the TRAMP complex is mediated by short peptides and important for snoRNA processing. Nucleic Acids Res. 2015 Feb 18;43(3):1848-58.

Funding

  • 08/2007 Awarded competitive research startup funding my NSU Division of Math Science and Technology in the amount of $3000: Funded.
  • 12/2007 Research consultancy fee awarded ($5,500) to characterize a C-8 surfactant based antimicrobial hand foam for a venture capitalist company Third Stream Bioscience Inc: Funded
  • 09/08 Co-investigator on a NASA funded 5 year $5.5 million cooperativeagreement (NNX08B4A47A) focused on the study of space microbiology and the effects of microgravity and space-like irradiation on bacterial pathogenesis: Funded
  • 02/09 Awarded a competitive id=mce_marker5,000 Texas Southern University seed grant (Sg0609) to support the study of two bacterial stress responses: cold growth and immunological host cell challenge of both Gram positive and negative pathogens: Funded
  • 09/09 Submitted a Department of Defense grant proposal to the Army Research Office (ARO) entitled Characterization of /Yersinia pestis/ stress responses and Virulence (3 years @ $360,000): currently under review
  • 11/09 Submitted a TSU seed grant entitled Evaluation of the Role Played by Ribonucleases in Bacterial Virulence for $20,000: denied funding based on a disqualification for possessing external funding support through NASA Not Funded
  • 02/10Submitted proposal/application for the Department of Homeland SecuritySummer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions: Not Funded
  • 02/10 Co-investigator NIH R01 entitled/: Identification of new antigens for a plague/vaccine/ Period: 12/01/2010-11/30/2015 Total amount: id=mce_marker,923,068: Funded.
  • 05/10 Primary Investigator: University of Texas Health Science Center Houston summer salary proposal entitled: Salary Reimbursement Agreement between The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and Texas Southern University Co-investigator Ambro van Hoof $9,333.33. Funded.
  • 02/11 Senior personnel on an NSF Research Opportunity Award (ROA) Antiviral Mechanisms of the Yeast RNA Decay Machinery and Viral Countermeasures 23,643 for 2 months (June and July 2011). Funded.
  • 1/12  Senior personnel on an NSF Research Opportunity Award (ROA) Antiviral Mechanisms of the Yeast RNA Decay Machinery and Viral Countermeasures, $6377.78 for 1 month (June 2012). Funded.
  • 07/12 Primary Investigator: University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Texas, summer salary proposal entitled: Salary Reimbursement Agreement between The University of Texas Medical Branch and Texas SouthernUniversity. Co-investigator Ashok Chopra. $12,755.56 (for 2 months salary July and August 2012). Funded
  • 05/13 Primary Investigator: University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Texas summer salary proposal entitled: Salary Reimbursement Agreement between The University of Texas Medical Branch and Texas SouthernUniversity. Co-investigator Ashok Chopra. $13,588.50 (for 2 months salary June and July 2013). Funded
  • 03/14 Co-Principal Investigator NSF RISE proposal (HRD-1345173) entitled “Characterization of Biomolecular Stress Responses” Funded $991,206 from 3/15/14-2/28/17.
  • 09/16 Co-Principal Investigator NSF HBCU UP Targeted Infusion project proposal (HRD 1622993) entitled “Infusion of Geospatial Informatics to Enhance an Undergraduate Biological Science Program.” Funded $399,999.00 (09/01/2016-8/31/2019).

Pittman, Helen

Research Interests

Player, Audrey

Education and Training

  • Ph.D. degree (Biomedical Sciences) Wright State University
  • Master Studies (Biology) Texas Southern University
  • B.S. degree (Biology) The University of North Texas

Honors & Awards

Whos Who of American College Students (1978-1979)

Whos Who of American Women (2002-2003) Employee Recognition at Ciba Corning Diagnostics for writing various research proposals

Community / Mayoral recognition for previous years of volunteer work at the Oakland (California) Brookdale Community Science Center, 2000 (award presented by ex- California governor, then Mayor of Oakland, Jerry Brown.) Quoted in The Scientist Magazine (Minerd J, Minerd A The Scientist 19 (5):30 (14 March 2005) expertise in manipulation of small-samples (ie, total RNA concentrations below 1ng (to 10pg)

Research Interests

Recent Publications

  1. Mukherjee, S, Richardson, A. Erikson, H., Player, A., Emmert-Buck, Mike. Identification of EpCam as a unique molecular target of prostate cancer stroma. Am J Pathol . 175 (6) (Oct 2009).
  2. Byun, JS, Wong,MM, Cui W, Idelman G, Li Q, Bilke S, Player A, . Gardner K. Dynamic bookmarkings of primary response genes by p300 and RNA polymerase II complexes. Proc Natl Acad Sci U.S.A., Oct 2009.
  3. Yan W, Shih J, Canales J, Hipp J, Player A, Hu N, Emmert-buck M, Erickson H. Identification of unique therapeutic targets in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Submitted to Molecular Cancer Therapuetics (MCT-10-0947), Oct 2010
  4. Robertson FM, Bondy M, Yang W, Yamauchi H, Krishnamurthy S, Player A, Barsky SH, Lucci A, Cristafanilli M. Inflammatory breast cancer: the disease, the biology, the treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 60 (6) Dec 2010.
  5. Wusheng, Y, Shih J, Rodriguez-Canales, Hipp, J, Player, A, Taylor, P, Emmert-Buck, M, Erickson, H. Identification of Unique Therapeutic targets in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Submitted to BioMed Central (May 2011).
  6. Player A, Oguamanam T, Okanmelu J, Burrell K, Hollomon M. Preliminary characterization of IL32 in basal-like/triple negative compared to other types of breast cell lines and tissues. BMC Res Notes. 2014 Aug 7;7:501.
  7. Burrell K and Player A. Characterization of the Interleukin transcript variants in triple negative breast cancers. American Journal of Immunology. 2016 Oct 16; 83.
  8.  Player A, Abraham N, Burrell K, Ondo Bengone I, Harris A, Nunez L, Willaims T, Kwende S, Walls W. Identification of candidate genes associated with triple negative breast cancer. Genes Cancer. 2017 Jul; 8(7-8):659-672. doi: 10.18632/genesandcancer.147.
  9. Abraham N, Kwende S, Player A. Identification of genes differentially expressed in triple negative breast cancer. ARC Journal of Cancer Science, Vol 3, Issue 2, Dec 2017, pp 1-7. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20431/2455-6009.0302001.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS AT SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS

  1. Cao, W., Antao, V and Player, A. Detection of mRNA using the branched DNA (bDNA) method. American Association of Cancer Research, New Orleans, 1998.
  2. Player, A., Shen, L., Antao, V. and Kolberg, J. Single copy gene detection using the branched DNA In Situ procedure. International Society for Analytical and Molecular Morphology, Santa Fe, 2000.
  3. Player, A., Dracheva, T., Fujii, T., Meerzaman, D., Fukouka, J., Curran, J., Gillespie, J., Buck, M., and Jin, J. In situ hybridization analysis of ISG12 and TDE in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. American Association of Cancer Research, San Francisco, CA 2002.
  4. Player, A., Kawasaki, E. LCM, microarrays and the precise definition of a cancer cell. Cambridge Health Institute, Laser Capture Microdissection Meeting, Boston MA April 2004.
  5. Player, A, Wang, Y and Kawasaki, ES. Amplification of small quantities of total RNA for gene expression profiling. Presentation at the American Association of Cancer Research, Annaheim CA, April 2005
  6. Player, A. Wang, Y, Woodson, K, Buck, M, and Kawasaki, E. Characterization of the prostate tumor microenvironment and its relationship to stemness. Stem Cell conference, Gordon Conference, Sept 2007.

Funding

Olufemi, Shodimu-Emmanuel

Education and Training

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Genetics and Human Genetics Howard University, Washington, D.C. 1997
  • Master of Science in Biology – Texas Southern University Houston, Texas. 1991
  • Bachelor of Science in Biology / Minor in Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. 1988

Research Interests

Research/Scholarly Activities

I have listed and briefly described below in chronological order my research and mentorship experiences during the course of my training and career development. I worked and trained at several institutions, such as UT-MDACC, UC, NIH, HU and TSU where I have first hand experiences and trainings in different molecular biology 4 techniques and tools that are used to study and analyze biological problems. In addition, I attained versatile knowledge in different areas of biological sciences through, interdepartmental trainings, seminars, meetings, workshops and collaborations. My training at these institutions has built my confidence and prepared me to be a teacher, a scientist and a leader that can design and manage independent research projects. I have participated in research projects that dealt with both aspects of human and non-human studies, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, neuromuscular disease, ischemic reperfusion injury in animal model and avian genome studies. 2011-Present: Assistant Professor, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. In an effort to continue my endeavor and quest for research at TSU, my research is focused on genetic diseases and genomic studies. I am a member of the graduate faculty and I supervise graduate students research and sever on graduate student thesis and dissertation committees. I also supervise undergraduate students research projects as well.

2009-2010: Adjunct/Visiting Assistant Professor, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. In an effort to continue my endeavor and quest for research at TSU, I volunteered to participate in research projects in which we study the effects of microgravity and radiation on microorganisms during NASA spaceflight missions. In the lab, I helped and supervised the graduate students, as well as the C-BER student fellows to design the molecular biology experimental approaches on how to study the effects simulated microgravity and radiation on several microorganism models as well as cell models by employing studies that will allow us to study several biological pathways, such as the cell cycle pathway, the DNA damage and repair pathway, the stress and survival pathway, the apoptosis pathway, including the role of DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation, non-coding RNA and alternative spliced RNA. The molecular biology experimental designed approaches were included in the poster presentation of the C-BER student fellows during 2010 NASA site visit to TSU-NASA C-BER program. I also helped and supervised the students in the lab with molecular biology experimental technical problems and designs.

2005-2009: Research Scientist, the UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. At MDACC, I worked on two different projects. My first research project involves positional cloning of the non-p53 Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) gene. I used several different molecular genetic techniques, such as (1) genotyping of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples with microsatellite markers and SNPs array technology to generate genotyping data for linkage analysis,(2) searching the UCSC Genome Browser and other database for di, tri and tetra nucleotide repeats to design additional microsatellite primer sets, (3) using multiple available information that are published in journals to identify potential candidate genes in non-p53 LFS locus minimal interval on chromosome 1q23.3, (4) performing direct sequencing of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples to detect mutations in candidate genes, and (5) performing RT-PCR to detect aberrant/alternative spliced cDNA in non-p53 LFS families RNA samples.

My second research project involves myotonic dystrophy (DM) disease. My part in the DM project are (1) to decipher the mechanism(s) by which the mutant (CCUG)DM2 RNA transcripts cause DM2 disease, and (2) to decipher the role and function(s) of aberrant spliced ZNF9 mRNA 5 transcripts in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) pathogenesis. For the DM2 project I also used several molecular biology and genetic techniques, such as (1) seeding in tissue culture both human and mouse myoblast cell lines, (2) isolating of DNA, RNA, and Protein from cell lines, (3) making cDNA from total RNA, (4) running western blot, (5) running PCR / Q-RT-PCR, (6) performing drug treatment on cell lines and (7) using total cDNA made from the drug treatment experiment to perform gene expression profiling and (8) performing data analysis, (9) performing cloning of DNA / cDNA into fluorescence or non-fluorescence tagged expression vectors, (10) performing transfection tagged DNA constructs into mammalian cells and (11) performing transformation in E. coli cells, (12) performing in situ fluorescence (IF) hybridization, and (13) using fluorescence microscopes (i.e. epifluorescence and deconvolution and others) to determine co-localization or interaction of proteins in both cultured human and mouse cell lines and mouse tissues.

In 2006, I mentored and supervised DM2 research project of a high school summer student, Nicholas Russell. He was admitted to Carnegie Mellon University in September 2006. In 2007, he did his summer program Carnegie Mellon University and in 2008, he was accepted to the SMAT summer program at Baylor College of Medicine. I served as his reference. In May 2010, Nicholas Russell graduated with a combined degree in bioengineering and mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. 2002-2005: Post-Doctoral Fellow, the UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. I worked on the physical mapping and the positional cloning of the non-p53 Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) gene. We mapped the 3rd LFS locus to Human chromosome 1q23.3 by using several molecular genetic techniques, such as (1) genotyping non-p53 LFS families DNA samples with microsatellite markers and SNPs array technology to generate genotyping data for linkage analysis, (2) searching the UCSC Genome Browser and other database for di, tri and tetra nucleotide repeats to design additional microsatellite primer sets, and (3) using multiple available information that are published in journals to identify potential candidate genes in non-p53 LFS locus minimal interval on chromosome 1q23.3., (4) performing direct sequencing of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples to detect mutations in candidate genes, and (5) using RT-PCR to detect aberrant/alternative spliced cDNA in non-p53 LFS families RNA samples.

1997-2000: Post-Doctoral Fellow and New Investigator, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. My work involves identification of gene(s) involved in or associated with essential hypertension. I was part of the group that worked on essential hypertension research, and we showed that functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the alpha human epithelia sodium Channel (I^+–hENaC) isoform contribute to essential hypertension in the African American population by using several molecular genetic techniques, such as (1) direct sequencing of DNA samples of essential hypertensive African Americans to detect mutations (variants: SNPs) in candidate genes, (2) performing association studies of functional SNPs, and (3) performing electrophysiological studies of functional I^+–hENaC SNPs in Xenopus oocytes to infer the role of I^+–hENaC variants on sodium (Na+) ion conduction in the distal tubule of the kidney. 6 In summer 1999, I mentored and supervised the hypertension research project of a college student and a high school student in Dr. Anil Menons lab.

1994-1997: Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Fellow, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland. I am a recipient of IRTA award at the NHGRI. I worked on the positional cloning of the MEN1 gene and I was part of the group that identified and cloned the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 (MEN1) gene, and also, I showed that mutation in the MEN1 gene causes MEN1Burin cancer. Several different molecular genetic techniques were used to identify and clone the MEN1 gene. The different molecular genetic techniques that were used to clone the MEN1 gene are as follows, (1) screening high density human chromosome cosmids and BAC libraries by both hybridization and PCR to identify clones, (2) constructing a physical map (contig) of the MEN1 locus, (3) identifying di, tri and tetra nucleotides repeats present in the clones to develop microsatellite markers (primers) used for linkage analysis and LOH analysis, (4) identifying recombination in affected families to reduce the genetic interval that harbors the putative gene, (5) using both cosmids and BAC clones DNA for exon trapping and screening high density human cDNA library to identify transcripts that were used to construct a transcript map of the MENI locus, (6) performing 5′ -3′ rapid amplification of cDNA end (5′ -3′ RACE), and (7) identifying candidate genes that were directly sequenced for mutations in MEN1 families. 1991-1992: Research Assistant / Teaching Assistant, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. I taught undergraduate biology lab, and I proctored exams and graded examination papers. I supervised both undergraduate and graduate student experiments in Dr. Edwards lab. Also, I organized the lab journal clubs, and I was responsible for maintaining and supervising the daily operation of the lab, as well as maintaining equipments and ordering supplies. I also worked on the characterization of satellite repetitive DNA elements in the avian genome.

1989-1991: MBRS Fellow / Graduate Teaching Assistance, Texas Southern University, Houston Texas. I taught undergraduate biology lab; and also I proctored exams and graded examination papers. I also attended scientific conferences, including MBRS conferences and I gave oral presentations. I worked on research project that study the effect of heavy metal on in vitro protein synthesis to infer that heavy metals which are environmental toxicants can cause several disease that are detrimental to human health.

Recent Publications

Olayinka Raheem, Shodimu-Emmanuel Olufemi, Linda L Bachinski, Anna Vihola, Mario Sirito, Jeanette Holmlund-Hampf, Hannu Haapasalo, Yi-Ping Li, Bjarne Udd, and Ralf Krahe. Mutant (CCTG)n Expansion Causes Abnormal Expression of Zinc Finger Protein 9 in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2 (DM2). The American Journal of Pathology, Oct. 22. 2010. [Epub ahead of print].

Vihola A, Bachinski LL, Sirito M, Olufemi SE, Hajibashi S, Baggerly KA, Raheem O, Haapasalo H, Suominen T, Holmlund-Hampf J, Paetau A, Cardani R, Meola G, Kalimo H, EdstrA~[Paragraph]m L, Krahe R, Udd B.Differences in Aberrant Expression and Splicing of Sarcomeric Proteins in the Myotonic Dystrophies DM1and DM2. Acta Neuropathol. 12 Jan. 2010. [Epub ahead of print].

Moore-Olufemi SD, Olufemi SE, Lott S, Sato N, Kozar RA, Moore FA, Radhakrishnan RS, Shah S, Jimenez F, Kone BC, Cox CS Jr. Intestinal Ischemic Preconditioning After Ischemic/Reperfusion in Rat Intestine: Profiling Global Gene Expression Patterns. Dig Dicks Sci. 25 Sep. 2009 [Epub ahead of print].

Steven T. Lott, Nanyue Chen, Dawn S. Chandler, Qifeng YanG, luo Wang, Marivonne Rodriguez, Hongyan Xie, Seetharaman Balasenthil, Thomas A. Buchhholz, Aysegul A. Sahin, Katrina Chaung, Baili Zhang, Shodimu-Emmanuel Olufemi, Jinyun Chen, Henry Adams, Vimia Band, Adel K El-Naggar, Marsha L. Frazier, Khandan Keyomarsi, Kelly K. Hunt, Subrata Sen, Bruce Haffty, Stenphen M. Hewitt, Ralf Krahe and Ann McNeill Killary. DEAR1 Is a Dominant Regulator of Acinar Morphogenesis and an Independent Predictor of Local Recurrence-Free Survival in Early-Onset Breast Cancer. Plos Medicine, Vol. 5, Issue 5 May 2009.

S.D. Moore-Olufemi, J. Padalecki, S.E. Olufemi, H. Xue, D.H. Oliver, R.S. Radhakrishnan, S.J. Allen, F.A. Moore, R. Stewart, G.A. Laine, and C.S. Cox, Jr. Intestinal Edema: Effect of Enteral Feeding on Motility and Gene Expression. Journal of Surgical Research. 24 Oct 2008.

Research Experience

I have listed and briefly described below in chronological order my research and mentorship experiences during the course of my training and career development. I worked and trained at several institutions, such as UT-MDACC, UC, NIH, HU and TSU where I have first hand experiences and trainings in different molecular biology techniques and tools that are used to study and analyze biological problems. In addition, I attained versatile knowledge in different areas of biological sciences through, interdepartmental trainings, seminars, meetings, workshops and collaborations. My training at these institutions has built my confidence and prepared me to be a teacher, a scientist and a leader that can design and manage independent research projects. I have participated in research projects that dealt with both aspects of human and non-human studies, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, neuromuscular disease, ischemic reperfusion injury in animal model and avian genome studies.

2011-Present: Assistant Professor, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. In an effort to continue my endeavor and quest for research at TSU, my research is focused on genetic diseases and genomic studies. I am a member of the graduate faculty and I supervise graduate students research and sever on graduate student thesis and dissertation committees. I also supervise undergraduate students research projects as well.

2009-2010: Adjunct/Visiting Assistant Professor, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. In an effort to continue my endeavor and quest for research at TSU, I volunteered to participate in research projects in which we study the effects of microgravity and radiation on microorganisms during NASA spaceflight missions. In the lab, I helped and supervised the graduate students, as well as the C-BER student fellows to design the molecular biology experimental approaches on how to study the effects simulated microgravity and radiation on several microorganism models as well as cell models by employing studies that will allow us to study several biological pathways, such as the cell cycle pathway, the DNA damage and repair pathway, the stress and survival pathway, the apoptosis pathway, including the role of DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation, non-coding RNA and alternative spliced RNA. The molecular biology experimental designed approaches were included in the poster presentation of the C-BER student fellows during 2010 NASA site visit to TSU-NASA C-BER program. I also helped and supervised the students in the lab with molecular biology experimental technical problems and designs.

2005-2009: Research Scientist, the UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. At MDACC, I worked on two different projects. My first research project involves positional cloning of the non-p53 Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) gene. I used several different molecular genetic techniques, such as (1) genotyping of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples with microsatellite markers and SNPs array technology to generate genotyping data for linkage analysis, (2) searching the UCSC Genome Browser and other database for di, tri and tetra nucleotide repeats to design additional microsatellite primer sets, (3) using multiple available information that are published in journals to identify potential candidate genes in non-p53 LFS locus minimal interval on chromosome 1q23.3, (4) performing direct sequencing of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples to detect mutations in candidate genes, and (5) performing RT-PCR to detect aberrant/alternative spliced cDNA in non-p53 LFS families RNA samples.

My second research project involves myotonic dystrophy (DM) disease. My part in the DM project are (1) to decipher the mechanism(s) by which the mutant (CCUG)DM2 RNA transcripts cause DM2 disease, and (2) to decipher the role and function(s) of aberrant spliced ZNF9 mRNA transcripts in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) pathogenesis. For the DM2 project I also used several molecular biology and genetic techniques, such as (1) seeding in tissue culture both human and mouse myoblast cell lines, (2) isolating of DNA, RNA, and Protein from cell lines, (3) making cDNA from total RNA, (4) running western blot, (5) running PCR / Q-RT-PCR, (6) performing drug treatment on cell lines and (7) using total cDNA made from the drug treatment experiment to perform gene expression profiling and (8) performing data analysis, (9) performing cloning of DNA / cDNA into fluorescence or non-fluorescence tagged expression vectors, (10) performing transfection tagged DNA constructs into mammalian cells and (11) performing transformation in E. coli cells, (12) performing in situ fluorescence (IF) hybridization, and (13) using fluorescence microscopes (i.e. epifluorescence and deconvolution and others) to determine co-localization or interaction of proteins in both cultured human and mouse cell lines and mouse tissues.

Funding

Texas Southern University (TSU) Seed Grant 2011-2012 Academic Year
Amount: $8,500

Miranda, Hector

Education and Training

  • Ph.D. in Biological Sciences, University of Cincinnati, 1997 (Biological Sciences)
  • M.S. in Zoology, University of the Philippines at Los Banos, 1987 (Zoology)
  • B.S. in Biology, University of the Philippines at Los Banos, 1981 (Biology)
    • Post-Doctoral Work: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1997), Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Human Genetics (1997-1998), University of Cincinnati (2002-2004)

Biography

Ecology, Evolution, Conservation Biology
My research interest lies at the intersections of systematics, ecology, evolution and conservation biology. I seek to understand patterns and processes of organismal diversification. My work deals mainly on Philippine birds of prey and owls, and tropical biodiversity. I use archipelagic settings such as the Philippines to test hypotheses on phylogeography and adaptive radiation.

Research/Scholarly Activities

Phylogeography, evolution and conservation of Philippine birds, birds of prey and owls.

Phylogeography of Old World pheasants

Rodent systematics and molecular evolution

Select Publications

Quach, T. D. M. Brooks, and H. C. Miranda, Jr. 2014. Complete mitochondrial genome of Palawan peacock-pheasant Polyplectron napoleonis (Galliformes, Phasianidae). Mitochondrial DNA 27:1-2.

Miranda, H. C., Jr. D. Brooks and R. S. Kennedy. 2011. Phylogeny and taxonomic review of Philippine scops-owls (Strigidae): parallel diversification of highland and lowland clades. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 123:441-453.

Miranda, H. C., Jr. 2010. The Philippine Eagle. In Tingay, R. and T. Katzner (eds.). The Eagle Watchers. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.

Blanga-Kanfi, S., H. Miranda, O. Penn, T. Pupko, R. W. DeBry, and D. Huchony.2009. Rodent phylogeny revised: Analysis of six nuclear genes from all major rodent clades. BMC Evolutionary Biology 9:71.

Kennedy, R. H. and H. C. Miranda, Jr. 2008. Family Rhabdornithidae. Pages 188-195. In: J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D. A. Christie (eds). Handbook of the Birds of the World: Vol 13. Penduline-tits to Shrikes. Lynx Edicions.Barcelona, Spain.

Bueser, G. L., K. Bueser, D. S. Afan, D. I. Salvador, J. W. Grier, R. S. Kennedy and H. C. Miranda, Jr. 2003. Nesting density and distribution of Philippine Eagles in Mindanao: What do we know after 100 years? Ibis.145:130-135.

Kennedy, R. S., P. Gonzales, E. Dickinson, H. C. Miranda, Jr. and T. Fisher. 2000. A Guide to the Birds of the Philippines. Oxford University Press, Oxford UK.

Mindell, D. P., M. D. Sorenson, C. J. Huddleston, H. Miranda, Jr., A. Knight, S. J Sawchuck, and T. Yuri. 1997. Phylogenetic relationships among and within select avian orders based on mitochondrial DNA. Pp. 211-245 in D. P. Mindell, (ed). Avian Molecular Evolution and Systematics. Academic Press, New York.

Funding

Co-Investigator. NASA TSU University Research Center – Center for Bionanotechnology and
Environmental Research (CBER) 2008-2014. Status (closed)

Courses Taught

  • Biology 131: General BiologyI
  • Biology 132: General Biology II
  • Biology 341: Organismic Biology
  • Biology 439: Principles of Biology
  • Biology 434: Evolutionary Biology
  • Biology 332: Bioinformatics
  • Biology 334: Conservation Biology
  • Biology 712: Biosynthetic Mechanisms (graduate level)

Jackson Desiree

Biography

Desirée Jackson earned her Ph.D. degree in Biomedical Sciences from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee in 1992, and Bachelor of Science degree in Biological Sciences from the State University of New York in 1983. She is currently an Associate Professor of Biology. She has served as researcher, faculty, and administrator at Baylor College of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and as faculty, and administrator at Texas Southern University.

As the Assistant Dean for Student Services and Instructional Support, Dr. Jackson is responsible for student registration, enrollment, counseling, recruitment, instructional support, and all other college-wide student services. She is also expected to provide advice to the Dean regarding any issues related to student services.

Research Interests

Gene expression, transcriptomics, proteomics