COLLEGE OF SCIENCE,
ENGINEERING AND
TECHNOLOGY
Associate Professor
SB 203Q | (713) 313.7015
olufemis@tsu.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Education and Training

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Genetics and Human Genetics Howard University, Washington, D.C. 1997
  • Master of Science in Biology – Texas Southern University Houston, Texas. 1991
  • Bachelor of Science in Biology / Minor in Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. 1988

Research Interests

Research/Scholarly Activities

I have listed and briefly described below in chronological order my research and mentorship experiences during the course of my training and career development. I worked and trained at several institutions, such as UT-MDACC, UC, NIH, HU and TSU where I have first hand experiences and trainings in different molecular biology 4 techniques and tools that are used to study and analyze biological problems. In addition, I attained versatile knowledge in different areas of biological sciences through, interdepartmental trainings, seminars, meetings, workshops and collaborations. My training at these institutions has built my confidence and prepared me to be a teacher, a scientist and a leader that can design and manage independent research projects. I have participated in research projects that dealt with both aspects of human and non-human studies, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, neuromuscular disease, ischemic reperfusion injury in animal model and avian genome studies. 2011-Present: Assistant Professor, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. In an effort to continue my endeavor and quest for research at TSU, my research is focused on genetic diseases and genomic studies. I am a member of the graduate faculty and I supervise graduate students research and sever on graduate student thesis and dissertation committees. I also supervise undergraduate students research projects as well.

2009-2010: Adjunct/Visiting Assistant Professor, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. In an effort to continue my endeavor and quest for research at TSU, I volunteered to participate in research projects in which we study the effects of microgravity and radiation on microorganisms during NASA spaceflight missions. In the lab, I helped and supervised the graduate students, as well as the C-BER student fellows to design the molecular biology experimental approaches on how to study the effects simulated microgravity and radiation on several microorganism models as well as cell models by employing studies that will allow us to study several biological pathways, such as the cell cycle pathway, the DNA damage and repair pathway, the stress and survival pathway, the apoptosis pathway, including the role of DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation, non-coding RNA and alternative spliced RNA. The molecular biology experimental designed approaches were included in the poster presentation of the C-BER student fellows during 2010 NASA site visit to TSU-NASA C-BER program. I also helped and supervised the students in the lab with molecular biology experimental technical problems and designs.

2005-2009: Research Scientist, the UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. At MDACC, I worked on two different projects. My first research project involves positional cloning of the non-p53 Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) gene. I used several different molecular genetic techniques, such as (1) genotyping of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples with microsatellite markers and SNPs array technology to generate genotyping data for linkage analysis,(2) searching the UCSC Genome Browser and other database for di, tri and tetra nucleotide repeats to design additional microsatellite primer sets, (3) using multiple available information that are published in journals to identify potential candidate genes in non-p53 LFS locus minimal interval on chromosome 1q23.3, (4) performing direct sequencing of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples to detect mutations in candidate genes, and (5) performing RT-PCR to detect aberrant/alternative spliced cDNA in non-p53 LFS families RNA samples.

My second research project involves myotonic dystrophy (DM) disease. My part in the DM project are (1) to decipher the mechanism(s) by which the mutant (CCUG)DM2 RNA transcripts cause DM2 disease, and (2) to decipher the role and function(s) of aberrant spliced ZNF9 mRNA 5 transcripts in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) pathogenesis. For the DM2 project I also used several molecular biology and genetic techniques, such as (1) seeding in tissue culture both human and mouse myoblast cell lines, (2) isolating of DNA, RNA, and Protein from cell lines, (3) making cDNA from total RNA, (4) running western blot, (5) running PCR / Q-RT-PCR, (6) performing drug treatment on cell lines and (7) using total cDNA made from the drug treatment experiment to perform gene expression profiling and (8) performing data analysis, (9) performing cloning of DNA / cDNA into fluorescence or non-fluorescence tagged expression vectors, (10) performing transfection tagged DNA constructs into mammalian cells and (11) performing transformation in E. coli cells, (12) performing in situ fluorescence (IF) hybridization, and (13) using fluorescence microscopes (i.e. epifluorescence and deconvolution and others) to determine co-localization or interaction of proteins in both cultured human and mouse cell lines and mouse tissues.

In 2006, I mentored and supervised DM2 research project of a high school summer student, Nicholas Russell. He was admitted to Carnegie Mellon University in September 2006. In 2007, he did his summer program Carnegie Mellon University and in 2008, he was accepted to the SMAT summer program at Baylor College of Medicine. I served as his reference. In May 2010, Nicholas Russell graduated with a combined degree in bioengineering and mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. 2002-2005: Post-Doctoral Fellow, the UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. I worked on the physical mapping and the positional cloning of the non-p53 Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) gene. We mapped the 3rd LFS locus to Human chromosome 1q23.3 by using several molecular genetic techniques, such as (1) genotyping non-p53 LFS families DNA samples with microsatellite markers and SNPs array technology to generate genotyping data for linkage analysis, (2) searching the UCSC Genome Browser and other database for di, tri and tetra nucleotide repeats to design additional microsatellite primer sets, and (3) using multiple available information that are published in journals to identify potential candidate genes in non-p53 LFS locus minimal interval on chromosome 1q23.3., (4) performing direct sequencing of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples to detect mutations in candidate genes, and (5) using RT-PCR to detect aberrant/alternative spliced cDNA in non-p53 LFS families RNA samples.

1997-2000: Post-Doctoral Fellow and New Investigator, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. My work involves identification of gene(s) involved in or associated with essential hypertension. I was part of the group that worked on essential hypertension research, and we showed that functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the alpha human epithelia sodium Channel (I^+–hENaC) isoform contribute to essential hypertension in the African American population by using several molecular genetic techniques, such as (1) direct sequencing of DNA samples of essential hypertensive African Americans to detect mutations (variants: SNPs) in candidate genes, (2) performing association studies of functional SNPs, and (3) performing electrophysiological studies of functional I^+–hENaC SNPs in Xenopus oocytes to infer the role of I^+–hENaC variants on sodium (Na+) ion conduction in the distal tubule of the kidney. 6 In summer 1999, I mentored and supervised the hypertension research project of a college student and a high school student in Dr. Anil Menons lab.

1994-1997: Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Fellow, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland. I am a recipient of IRTA award at the NHGRI. I worked on the positional cloning of the MEN1 gene and I was part of the group that identified and cloned the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 (MEN1) gene, and also, I showed that mutation in the MEN1 gene causes MEN1Burin cancer. Several different molecular genetic techniques were used to identify and clone the MEN1 gene. The different molecular genetic techniques that were used to clone the MEN1 gene are as follows, (1) screening high density human chromosome cosmids and BAC libraries by both hybridization and PCR to identify clones, (2) constructing a physical map (contig) of the MEN1 locus, (3) identifying di, tri and tetra nucleotides repeats present in the clones to develop microsatellite markers (primers) used for linkage analysis and LOH analysis, (4) identifying recombination in affected families to reduce the genetic interval that harbors the putative gene, (5) using both cosmids and BAC clones DNA for exon trapping and screening high density human cDNA library to identify transcripts that were used to construct a transcript map of the MENI locus, (6) performing 5′ -3′ rapid amplification of cDNA end (5′ -3′ RACE), and (7) identifying candidate genes that were directly sequenced for mutations in MEN1 families. 1991-1992: Research Assistant / Teaching Assistant, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. I taught undergraduate biology lab, and I proctored exams and graded examination papers. I supervised both undergraduate and graduate student experiments in Dr. Edwards lab. Also, I organized the lab journal clubs, and I was responsible for maintaining and supervising the daily operation of the lab, as well as maintaining equipments and ordering supplies. I also worked on the characterization of satellite repetitive DNA elements in the avian genome.

1989-1991: MBRS Fellow / Graduate Teaching Assistance, Texas Southern University, Houston Texas. I taught undergraduate biology lab; and also I proctored exams and graded examination papers. I also attended scientific conferences, including MBRS conferences and I gave oral presentations. I worked on research project that study the effect of heavy metal on in vitro protein synthesis to infer that heavy metals which are environmental toxicants can cause several disease that are detrimental to human health.

Recent Publications

Olayinka Raheem, Shodimu-Emmanuel Olufemi, Linda L Bachinski, Anna Vihola, Mario Sirito, Jeanette Holmlund-Hampf, Hannu Haapasalo, Yi-Ping Li, Bjarne Udd, and Ralf Krahe. Mutant (CCTG)n Expansion Causes Abnormal Expression of Zinc Finger Protein 9 in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2 (DM2). The American Journal of Pathology, Oct. 22. 2010. [Epub ahead of print].

Vihola A, Bachinski LL, Sirito M, Olufemi SE, Hajibashi S, Baggerly KA, Raheem O, Haapasalo H, Suominen T, Holmlund-Hampf J, Paetau A, Cardani R, Meola G, Kalimo H, EdstrA~[Paragraph]m L, Krahe R, Udd B.Differences in Aberrant Expression and Splicing of Sarcomeric Proteins in the Myotonic Dystrophies DM1and DM2. Acta Neuropathol. 12 Jan. 2010. [Epub ahead of print].

Moore-Olufemi SD, Olufemi SE, Lott S, Sato N, Kozar RA, Moore FA, Radhakrishnan RS, Shah S, Jimenez F, Kone BC, Cox CS Jr. Intestinal Ischemic Preconditioning After Ischemic/Reperfusion in Rat Intestine: Profiling Global Gene Expression Patterns. Dig Dicks Sci. 25 Sep. 2009 [Epub ahead of print].

Steven T. Lott, Nanyue Chen, Dawn S. Chandler, Qifeng YanG, luo Wang, Marivonne Rodriguez, Hongyan Xie, Seetharaman Balasenthil, Thomas A. Buchhholz, Aysegul A. Sahin, Katrina Chaung, Baili Zhang, Shodimu-Emmanuel Olufemi, Jinyun Chen, Henry Adams, Vimia Band, Adel K El-Naggar, Marsha L. Frazier, Khandan Keyomarsi, Kelly K. Hunt, Subrata Sen, Bruce Haffty, Stenphen M. Hewitt, Ralf Krahe and Ann McNeill Killary. DEAR1 Is a Dominant Regulator of Acinar Morphogenesis and an Independent Predictor of Local Recurrence-Free Survival in Early-Onset Breast Cancer. Plos Medicine, Vol. 5, Issue 5 May 2009.

S.D. Moore-Olufemi, J. Padalecki, S.E. Olufemi, H. Xue, D.H. Oliver, R.S. Radhakrishnan, S.J. Allen, F.A. Moore, R. Stewart, G.A. Laine, and C.S. Cox, Jr. Intestinal Edema: Effect of Enteral Feeding on Motility and Gene Expression. Journal of Surgical Research. 24 Oct 2008.

Research Experience

I have listed and briefly described below in chronological order my research and mentorship experiences during the course of my training and career development. I worked and trained at several institutions, such as UT-MDACC, UC, NIH, HU and TSU where I have first hand experiences and trainings in different molecular biology techniques and tools that are used to study and analyze biological problems. In addition, I attained versatile knowledge in different areas of biological sciences through, interdepartmental trainings, seminars, meetings, workshops and collaborations. My training at these institutions has built my confidence and prepared me to be a teacher, a scientist and a leader that can design and manage independent research projects. I have participated in research projects that dealt with both aspects of human and non-human studies, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, neuromuscular disease, ischemic reperfusion injury in animal model and avian genome studies.

2011-Present: Assistant Professor, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. In an effort to continue my endeavor and quest for research at TSU, my research is focused on genetic diseases and genomic studies. I am a member of the graduate faculty and I supervise graduate students research and sever on graduate student thesis and dissertation committees. I also supervise undergraduate students research projects as well.

2009-2010: Adjunct/Visiting Assistant Professor, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. In an effort to continue my endeavor and quest for research at TSU, I volunteered to participate in research projects in which we study the effects of microgravity and radiation on microorganisms during NASA spaceflight missions. In the lab, I helped and supervised the graduate students, as well as the C-BER student fellows to design the molecular biology experimental approaches on how to study the effects simulated microgravity and radiation on several microorganism models as well as cell models by employing studies that will allow us to study several biological pathways, such as the cell cycle pathway, the DNA damage and repair pathway, the stress and survival pathway, the apoptosis pathway, including the role of DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation, non-coding RNA and alternative spliced RNA. The molecular biology experimental designed approaches were included in the poster presentation of the C-BER student fellows during 2010 NASA site visit to TSU-NASA C-BER program. I also helped and supervised the students in the lab with molecular biology experimental technical problems and designs.

2005-2009: Research Scientist, the UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. At MDACC, I worked on two different projects. My first research project involves positional cloning of the non-p53 Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) gene. I used several different molecular genetic techniques, such as (1) genotyping of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples with microsatellite markers and SNPs array technology to generate genotyping data for linkage analysis, (2) searching the UCSC Genome Browser and other database for di, tri and tetra nucleotide repeats to design additional microsatellite primer sets, (3) using multiple available information that are published in journals to identify potential candidate genes in non-p53 LFS locus minimal interval on chromosome 1q23.3, (4) performing direct sequencing of non-p53 LFS families DNA samples to detect mutations in candidate genes, and (5) performing RT-PCR to detect aberrant/alternative spliced cDNA in non-p53 LFS families RNA samples.

My second research project involves myotonic dystrophy (DM) disease. My part in the DM project are (1) to decipher the mechanism(s) by which the mutant (CCUG)DM2 RNA transcripts cause DM2 disease, and (2) to decipher the role and function(s) of aberrant spliced ZNF9 mRNA transcripts in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) pathogenesis. For the DM2 project I also used several molecular biology and genetic techniques, such as (1) seeding in tissue culture both human and mouse myoblast cell lines, (2) isolating of DNA, RNA, and Protein from cell lines, (3) making cDNA from total RNA, (4) running western blot, (5) running PCR / Q-RT-PCR, (6) performing drug treatment on cell lines and (7) using total cDNA made from the drug treatment experiment to perform gene expression profiling and (8) performing data analysis, (9) performing cloning of DNA / cDNA into fluorescence or non-fluorescence tagged expression vectors, (10) performing transfection tagged DNA constructs into mammalian cells and (11) performing transformation in E. coli cells, (12) performing in situ fluorescence (IF) hybridization, and (13) using fluorescence microscopes (i.e. epifluorescence and deconvolution and others) to determine co-localization or interaction of proteins in both cultured human and mouse cell lines and mouse tissues.

Funding

Texas Southern University (TSU) Seed Grant 2011-2012 Academic Year
Amount: $8,500